August 18, 2022

Reporters’ Diary

Factual Reportage

Ports account for over 70% of goods movement globally- Ehiguese

By Joy Enamuna

The Centre Director of the Centre for Logistics & Transport Education Mr Francis A. Ehiguese has said that the global businesses through the ports accounts for over 70% of goods moved across the world contributes about 41% to the global GDP and employs millions of people.

Speaking at a Conference Organized by CILT Nigeria in a paper with theme:                                                                                        Port Environment and Infrastructure Development, a panacea for Landward Decongestion, Ehiguese said the subsector has led to high level of industrial, commercial and technological revolution across the globe.

According to him, Nigeria being a major player, particularly in the West Africa Region records 76 percent of shipping business within the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) which comprises sixteen (16) countries.

“About  76%  of  shipping  business  carried  out  in  the  Region  takes place in Nigeria. Again, because Nigeria is rich in natural and agricultural resources and  being  the  sixth  largest  producer  of  crude  oil  in  the  world makes her major destination port for ships”.

Ehiguese stressed that the Seaports Marine transpiration is a crucial link in international trade and the global economy.

According to him sources  estimate  that  80  percent  of  global  trade  by volume  and  70  percent  by  value  are  transported  by  sea  and arrive at ports around the world.

He said  the  strategic  place  of  the  ports  within  the  maritime  industry and  beyond  is  crucial  to  a  level  where  its  absence  or malfunctioning can collapse the economy of nations.  

According to him the major concern in port-landward interface port management efficiencies coming from intermodal connection that are fraught with intractable problems.

“These  are  traceable  to  Road  Traffic  Congestion  (RTC),  lack  of  or inadequate Rail Transport Service (RTS) and weak Inland Waterways Transportation (IWT), especially in Nigeria.

“There  are  also  some  ports’  internal  issues  that  directly  or  indirectly affect  or  disrupt the logistics chain  of  freighting  services  outside  the ports. Some of these are none or partial digitization of services, cargo clearance process infractions, inabilities of regulatory authorities to regulate/manage traffic inflow and out flows within the port area and environment.

Ehiguese said Landward activities have the capacity to cause heightened disruptions in many port-related functions and their effects can be massive.

“It must be noted that ports are not island to themselves, they need to interface with other forms of transpiration (road, rail, inlands) and in so doing are able to provide canning services, all in a bid to meet the needs of ship-owners, shippers, and those with connected interests.

 A lack of or a weak interface between ports and landward linkages will always  result  in  disruptions  of  unimaginable  magnitudes:  Ships  delays, cargo  longer  stay  in  ships  or  at  berthing/storage  areas,  operational disconnect at both within and outside the ports.

“As  a  norm,  no  port  or  ports  function  optimally  without  putting  in  place  strategies  for cargo evacuation and distribution to landward areas, which are the final destination points of goods.

“It must be noted that ports are not island to themselves, they need to interface with other forms of transportation (road, rail, inlands) and in so doing are able to provide connecting services, all in a bid to meet the needs of ship-owners, shippers, and those with connected interests.

“A lack of or a weak interface between ports and landward linkages will always result in disruptions of unimaginable magnitudes: Ships delays, cargo longer stay in ships or at berthing/storage areas, operational disconnect at both within and outside the ports,” he added.